Caregivers are vital to stroke recovery

Becoming a caregiver for someone during stroke recovery may require a long-term commitment of time and energy. And, it can be a real challenge. Don’t try to go it alone. Involve a wider circle of family and friends to help you in your new role as caregiver. Help for those undergoing stroke recovery can also come from your local community or medical and social services organizations.

Whether you are a spouse, son or daughter, sibling, in-law, or friend, your job as caregiver during stroke recovery is an important one. It is also a challenging one. Caregiving can be exhausting, both physically and emotionally. Your loved one may be forced into the unfamiliar position of being dependent on others for things they once did themselves. Be as accepting and forgiving as possible. Do everything you can to simplify daily activities. And don’t try and do it all yourself. Seek help from family and friends. Support groups for caregivers can be just as helpful as support groups for stroke survivors themselves.

STROKE RECOVERY & REHABILITATION film for SURVIVORS & CAREGIVERS

7 Comments on this article

  • Gini May 6, 2011

    You sre more important than you will ever know to your stroke survivor. Please take care of yourself and get as much help as you can! Go to Stroke Support meetings, bring pad and paper to get important contact numbers. Ask questions for help in the group and privately later. Make yourself a phone directory, a journal of everyone you meet and every question you have as well as events … the “milestones” met, the disappointments, the hope and fears. Above all, take time to meditate, pray, sing, be quite, eat on time, exercise, see friends, find a trusted person to vent with and remember to live.

    Reply

    • valeriegreene May 31, 2011

      Gini, thank you for your comment about this very important piece of stroke survival. We need our caregivers …… they are angels in disguise

      Reply

  • Fuetsch1 June 4, 2011

    I am a caregiver of my 28 year old daughter who had two strokes and a seizure at the age of 25. She is unable to speak and walk independently. Being her caregiver, closest friend, and advocate is a huge demand every day. I would say love and laughter have been the best nurturing elements for both of us. This is much appreciated! The videos I just watched sum it up so well. This is an incredible journey that we must take with all the fortitude and persistence we can muster up each day!

    Reply

    • valeriegreene June 6, 2011

      Bless you, and thank you for your kind words. I remember how important having support was during my recovery. The smallest things meant so very much. Please stay in touch as our forum grows. We are just getting started.

      Reply

  • Anonymous June 8, 2011

    Bless you, and thank you for your kind words. I remember how important having support was during my recovery. I have always said caregivers are angels in disguise. As a caregiver, is there anything you feel would be helpful that we could add to the Bcenter?

    Reply

  • Beani9 Cecile June 10, 2011

    I would love to see more information on current as well as “on the horizon” studies for equipment that may help Caregivers, Advocates, and Stroke Survivors get an overview of the process. It’s like a darn Magic Show of unknowns that they only whip out when they want to. They don’t prepare us adequately.

    Reply

    • Anonymous June 13, 2011

      I agree. We are in the process of building another phase to
      the that will offer more direction. Meantime. I would like to hear
      your input and perhaps we can provide some good resources. Specifically, what type of equipment were you referring too?

      Reply

Add a comment